Besiege is a game about building medieval siege machines and destroying things with them. It’s a simple premise, but a game as deep as your imagination. The 3D editor uses a point-and-click interface you can learn in minutes, and testing your creation is as easy as hitting the play button.

In your bottomless toolbox you have wooden blocks, wheels, springs, pistons and all manner of monstrous weapons to glue together. Build a frame from wood, stick some wheels on, and voila, you’ve got a useless wheeled platform. But attach a rotating spinner block to the front, stick some blades onit, and suddenly you’ve created a medieval lawnmower of death.


You can use helicopter rotors and wings to create deadly flying machines out of DaVinci’s darkest nightmares, or you can create complex trebuchets, catapults, and launchers using springs and weights.

The challenge lies in creating a device that not only works, but is stable. Real-world physics applies: badly designed machines crack apart or topple when you hit the play button. If your creation is too heavy, its wheels will buckle. Wood is weak and bendy and has to be braced with metal.
There’s aspike-lined device that scoops up soldiers and crushes them into a gory paste
Besiege isn't just a sandbox, however. There’s a game in there. Each level presents an obstacle that must be destroyed or traversed a castle,a minefield, a village. Hundreds of tiny, squishy soldiers. It’s all about creating a machine that deals with these problems as creatively and efficiently as possible. You’ll often be under attack, so you’ll need to make sure your machine is sufficiently armoured as well.

Even in this Early Access version, which only has a few levels, Besiege is hugely entertaining.Spend a few minutes on the game’s dedicated subreddit (reddit.com/r/besiege) and you’ll be blown away by the things people are creating.

One player made a mobile aircraft carrier that dispatches a dozen bomb-dropping heli-drones. Another created a spike-lined device that scoops up an army of soldiers and crushes them into a gory paste. If this is what players are doing with the limited alpha toolkit,I can hardly imagine what they’ll pull off in the final game.

Spiderling is hoping to implement Steam Workshop support, which will enable people to share machines. I’m also hoping multiplayer is planned, because then it’ll be like a medieval Robot Wars. I want to be able to pit my ludicrous death-machines against those of my friends.

Comedy physics sandboxes built for cheap laughs are a plague on PC, but this is enough of a game to make it stand out. It’s amazingly well-rounded for suchanearly alpha, and I love the tilt-shift visual style. With more tools, weapons and materials to play with, and more singleplayer levels to tackle, Besiege can only get better.